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Jul. 23rd, 2017 11:42 am
bitterlawngnome: (Default)
[personal profile] bitterlawngnome


Hemerocallis 'Gold Prize'; 0300
© Bill Pusztai 2017

 


Lilium 'Gold Class'; 0597
© Bill Pusztai 2017

 


Hemerocallis 'Persian Market'; 0402
© Bill Pusztai 2017

buttonbush

Jul. 23rd, 2017 09:31 am
asakiyume: (glowing grass)
[personal profile] asakiyume
The Ashley reservoir is now one of my go-to places to take people when they visit. I took my old college friend and her husband there, and learned that the water-loving plant that I had thought looked very mangrove-y is buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis), which grows up and down the Atlantic coast and as far inland as the Mississippi, and is indeed a species in the mangrove biome!

Buttonbush

button bush (Cephalanthus occidentalis)

Yesterday I took [personal profile] osprey_archer there (and we read aloud to each other--so much fun), and lo and behold, the buttonbush was in bloom! I didn't have a camera, so she obliged me with a photo:

Buttonbush in flower, by [personal profile] osprey_archer



The flowers look like how pollen looks under a scanning electron microscope:

Buttonbush flowers....

buttonbush flowers

Pollen, much magnified:



(source)

Or, um... like an influenza virus...



(source)

It smells nice, though, and bees and butterflies love it. AS DO I.


mallorys_camera: (Default)
[personal profile] mallorys_camera
unnamed




The fabulous [profile] lifeinroseland is visiting this weekend. Whirlwind of activities!

Exciting tour of the Poughkeepsie ‘hood!

Strange dinner cobbled together from ingredients found at Ocean State Job Lot.

Sl-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-eep!

Dragonboat fest!

Local Downton Abbey sighting!

Rhinebeck retail! (I bought a $3 pair of scissors at Sharpy’s!)

More sl-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-eep!

Barbecue with L’s drunken boyfriend!

Sl-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-eep!

###

Today’s itinerary:

An intimate meetup with the Biggest Buddha in the Western Hemisphere.

Antiquing in Cold Springs.

Teary farewell!

###

I am dying to see if that pink Dior jacket in perfect shape that I didn’t buy for $50 three years because it was a tad too small is still in that antique store in Cold Springs.

It was still there two years ago although bizarrely, the store had doubled the price – I mean, if something doesn’t sell, aren’t you supposed to discount it?

The jacket was beautiful, and for an entire year, I tortured myself: I will write away to Hong Kong for fabric swatches to find one that will match its precise color – something between Hello Kitty and that frothy color you get when you beat Cool Whip into raspberry jello – and then I’ll find some struggling seamstress who is struggling to make commissary money to send to her sons – all three of whom have been locked away in the Fishkill Correctional Facility on cocaine trafficking charges – and I will pay her $25 bucks to lengthen the sleeves and do something about the shoulders –

But damn! A hundred bucks for something I can’t possibly ever wear? I don’t know.

If it’s still there, it should be up to $200 by now.

###

C is a pretty bright guy, but when he drinks, he turns into a total redneck. And not just any redneck: a redneck with liberal kneejerk biases. Thus, instead of the usual All Muslims are scum! from C, you get, All Republicans are scum!

“And the bastards are trying to shut down Poughkeepsie’s bus system!” C growled.

He had started slurring his words.

One of the big local issues hereabouts is that Dutchess County is finally wresting control of the city of Poughkeepsie’s flailing bus system. Really, the City of Poughkeepsie should not be running anything. The City of Poughkeepsie can barely keep its streets plowed in the winter: I still remember Adventures in Grocery Shopping between the months of December and March when I was living in Poughkeepsie and I did not have a car. They involved hopping from ice floe to ice floe kind of like Eliza fleeing the hounds.

Lois Lane does not have a car and is completely dependent on the public transportation system, so I get weekly updates on just how awful the City of Poughkeepsie’s administration of its bus system is.

Public transportation, in fact, is one of those few areas where economies of scale make perfect sense.

So, it was kind of a ridiculous argument to be having, plus I have a deep sense of C’s underlying tragedy – I can hardly look at him without flashing on the beautiful young artist wife who went mad and the beautiful young artist daughter who went mad: How do you survive tragedies like that without hating yourself, without thinking, It was something I did, I drove them mad?

Nonetheless, I continued having it – fueled, no doubt, by my deep contempt for Joel Tyner whom C kept citing as some kind of an authority. Joel Tyner is the flamingly left-wing county legislator from Rhinebeck, a weasely attention ‘ho of a type that’s very common in Berkeley – I used to date his clones regularly, which no doubt accounts for my deep, irremedial hatred for him. Talking about Joel Tyner in front of me is like waving a red flag in front of a bull.

Anyway, at some point, I realized I had an incredibly well-behaved guest sitting to my left who had not made a peep but who no doubt was bored to tears by this conversation, so I made C shake hands with me – See? We’re still buds! We can still discuss the finer points of cinematography in “The Creature from the Black Lagoon”! – and toddled off to the Patrizia-torium where I watched Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca.

What a ridiculous movie, and how Hitchcock must have suffered when Selznick and the Hayes Code board forced him to tack on that awful ending.

July 22--Veal Puccini

Jul. 22nd, 2017 09:31 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
My sister and her husband came over for dinner this evening. She is actually one of my step-sisters, but the one I grew up with, so she feels more like an actual sister. They are somewhat reclusive, so we don't see them very often, but when we do it is always great. I should note that we are also somewhat reclusive.

It was hot, so I wanted to minimize cooking indoors. I grilled a tri-tip and some ears of corn, made some basmati rice. and a chopped salad. This is the same chopped salad I have been experimenting with. I think I have it down now.

I like to put a bit of chopped up dry salami in the salad to give it some flavor. After I made it the last time, I had a dream that I had put the salami in a kitchen drawer instead of the refrigerator drawer where I keep that kind of stuff. When I looked in the drawer today for the salami, it wasn't there. I think I actually put it in a drawer somewhere. I looked but couldn't find it.

Anyway, the dinner was delicious. We spent a couple hours eating and catching up. I always enjoy their company.

I told my sister a story about the time me and my two friends flew down to LA to attend the premier of some Rolling Stones movie. This was right around the time we graduated from high school. There was a side story about magic mushrooms that got the story started, but my favorite memory was having dinner after the movie.

After the movie we went to a swanky Italian restaurant in Century City, but the host refused to seat us. We all had long hair, wore jeans, etc., and had backpacks on. This was in 1975. We looked like hippies, I guess.

The owner came up and asked what the problem was, and the host just pointed at us, like it was obvious we didn't belong there. The owner seemed to feel differently, and seated us himself, at the best table in the restaurant. He made menu suggestions. I had the Veal Puccini, which was delicious.

After the meal, he sent out a huge fruit plate, on the house, and sat with us a while to see what brought us to Century City. We told him about flying down to see the movie, and about our somewhat aborted trip to Disneyland (that's the mushroom story). He seemed fascinated by our adventure and told us to come back any time. He also gave us a nice discount on the dinner. I never made it back, unfortunately.

I did a google search and the place is long gone, but I found a newspaper write-up from 1974, which tells me the name of the restaurant was Puccini's Seafood Grotto, and that they had eight veal dishes on the menu.

I forgot to take any pictures of our dinner or us, so all I have is the shadow of my new cherry tree on my new fence.

tree shadow

Imperfect repairs and shady spaces

Jul. 22nd, 2017 09:42 pm
gurdonark: (Default)
[personal profile] gurdonark
Friday after work I walked in Breckinridge Park.  The Eastern Bluebirds played among the trees. We dined at Zoe's Kitchen for dinner. We turned in fairly early.

Saturday morning I took Beatrice for a walk. The heat was not bad. But the sun was bright. Beatrice walked from shady spot to shady spot. The walk took 50 minutes. When Beatrice was younger, the walk took thirty minutes.

At mid-day Saturday I went to Home Depot and to Loew's to get some hardware to use to fix my bicycle. I like that nuts and bolts and the like are always very inexpensive, though I miss the huge hardware store pull-out drawers of my youth. The modern system has lots of choice, but perhaps a bit less choice than the old-time hardware store offered.

When I got home, I tried to do the repairs. I was close to having gotten the right thing. But I had not quite gotten it right. I need a washer or two and shorter bolt or so to fix the front tire fender.  I used a wire tie to do a temporary fix on the bicycle. During my ride, the stop-gap stick I put in last week came loose. Its predecessor stick last years. I put in a new stick. It's a curious thing, but I forgot to get a nut and bolt to do the easiest repair--replacing the stick.  I rode for 8 miles, on the Watters Branch trail, the Urban Centre Loop Trail and back home.

I wanted to see the 3:30 p.m. showing of the movie "Valerian".  When I arrived at the Allen cinema, the 3:30 p.m. showing was not posted. I assumed it was sold out, though I did not brave the line to confirm it. Instead, I drove to Suncreek Park. There I could hike the Trail in the Woods, a shady alternative to the Texas heat.  I liked being in the shade by Rowlett Creek. I took pictures of Eastern Bluebirds in the shade.

I went home and read more of the current science fiction I am reading, "Constellation Games". My wife and I headed to Little Sichuan for dinner. Now we are watching a DVD of "Foyle's War". 

friday breakfast: organic frosted flakes
friday lunch: fried chicken breast and leg, french fries and a roll
friday dinner: mediterranean chicken, lentil soup, baked chips and fruit

saturday breakfast: brown rice cereal
saturday lunch: fried chicken breast, french fries and green beans
saturday dinner: shrimp with vegetables, a little rice and hot and sour soup

July 21--Stuck in Lodi, again

Jul. 21st, 2017 09:25 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
After doing my morning stuff I took a drive down to Lodi, which is about 20 minutes south of where I live. It used to be a sleepy farming town on the railroad line, and in many ways it still is. It is also a major wine producing region, and this has brought the town back to life.

Lodi

The old town area has been revitalized, with shops, restaurants, and wine tasting rooms. The town feels vibrant--there are viable businesses, a transit hub with a bunch of little shuttle busses heading out in all directions, and some nice street art. My town could learn a thing or two.

I wandered around for a few hours looking around and playing Ingress. Some of my compatriots built a big farm there, and I was able to get a bunch of gear. After not playing much for the past 6 months, I was pretty much out of stuff to play with. Now I have a lot. Tonight the Resistance came and destroyed that lovely farm. And so it goes.

I had a nice late lunch in a brewery/restaurant. It was satisfying. I walked a little bit more, then came home to work on my doctoral stuff for a while. My final summer report is due on Sunday.

birds

A series of sketches on a wall on a side street. One of my favorite finds today. Birds.

My step-sister and her husband are coming over for dinner tomorrow. They are somewhat reclusive, and we don't see them much, so this is a nice treat. Not sure what I am going to cook, but something that doesn't require too much heat, as it will be 102 here tomorrow.

Argument of the Day

Jul. 21st, 2017 04:52 pm
[personal profile] thisnewday
[This exchange took place in the upstairs bedroom across the hall from my study. It was between two of my visiting grandsons, Paulie, age 5, and Nikkie, age 8. Between them, and their 10-year-old brother Elliot, this has easily been the most entertaining two weeks I've had in this house...]

Paulie: (over-tired, whiney voice) "Get off my be-----d!"

Nikkie: "I'm not on your bed."

Paulie: "Your hair is touching my bed!"

Nikkie: "Hair is dead, so I'm not really touching your bed!"

Paulie: (apparently not buying the science) "Get off my be-----d!"

LPK
@Dreamwidth
7.21.2017
mallorys_camera: (Default)
[personal profile] mallorys_camera
unnamed


Spent another day doing absolutely nothing.

This is probably Not Good since starting this evening, I’m embarking upon ten – count ‘em! – days of intense socialization with (one assumes) limited opportunities for revenue generation or imagination mining.

And yet, and yet, and yet…

Absolutely nothing seems to be what I like to do.

Other people like to drink, take drugs, and party; climb Mt. Everest; sail yachts; watch PornHub; have orgies; eat German sausages; cook Italian food etc etc.

I like to do nothing.

Why not indulge myself?

###

In the afternoon, I did venture out in the oh-so-oppressive heat – 92 degrees, dew point 74 – to do some light shopping at Ocean State Job Lot. Ocean State is a bottom feeder in the liquidator food chain.

The setup of the store physically nauseates me – crude shelves, fluorescent lighting, no attempt at display – and yet I find myself really fascinated with the place: This is where brands go to die. It’s artificially created demand’s graveyard.

This is where Nabisco unloads all those Watermelon Oreos and Banana Split Oreos that nobody in their right mind would ever buy at a supermarket.

Wiffle ball set, anyone? Ocean State’s got like a billion of them.

Discontinued olive oils doctored with chlorophyll? Right this way.

I particularly like the counter of anti-aging skin serums, which since they’re the same ones being sold for $80-plus at various mall anchor client department stores, one must assume are years past their expiration dates so all those carcinogenic chemicals have had a chance to ripen and burst into bloom:

unnamed-1


Sometimes, it's true, you can find rare and wondrous things. Where else outside an ethnic grocery store (where you would certainly be overcharged) would you find six separate flavors of dried seaweed?

But in general, what you are looking at is the retail equivalent of cholesterol plaque.

##

Why the hell is there so much surplus inventory? Be-caw-w-w-se… we have an economy that owes the illusion of its robustness to the production of crud.

This would seem to indicate that inefficiencies exist at some very basic level of the capitalist economic model, no? It’s a particularly interesting question in light of the fact that bricks and mortar retail is under siege right now. Customers much prefer to buy their useless retail items online, which adds yet another layer of inefficiencies (distribution and transportation costs) to the model.

Really, it’s an unsustainable model.

Artificially created demand a/k/a marketing is a great way to persuade people to buy things they don’t want and can’t afford, but as the cost of things that people actually need to survive like housing, energy, and food continues to spiral and the gap between the 1% and the 99% continues to grow, ya gotta think at some point, in the not so distant future, this business model implodes.

I could write all day about this one.

But I’ve got to drag my sorry ass out on the trails before the temps hit 90.

Interrupted Silence

Jul. 20th, 2017 11:55 pm
gurdonark: (Default)
[personal profile] gurdonark
I worked another solid day. At lunch I walked in Heritage Park in Sachse. In the evening, I went to the Garland Salvation Army.  The Dallas Volunteer Attorney Program holds a monthly free legal clinic.  Tonight we had a few volunteers and a large number of clients. I did not keep a count on how many clients I met. But I know I met with several.

I read about the resignation of Mississippi football coach Hugo Freeze. Apparently, a school cellphone he used had a call on it to an escort service. I take no joy in his error. But I do wonder when folks will learn about using other folks' devices to conduct such calls.  It appears that an attorney for his predecessor, Houston Nutt, found the call using a Freedom of Information request.  As I understand it, Nutt is pursuing a defamation case against the university, claiming that Mr. Nutt is being blamed for recruiting violations at the school. Sports is its own soap opera.

I like social media. I do not like, though, the way that one loses touch with folks.


July 20--Agatha and Edith

Jul. 20th, 2017 09:30 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
For some reason today I thought about whether I missed being a bedside nurse. I suppose I miss parts of it. I miss spending time with patients and their families, talking to them about what is going on, helping to get them through whatever it is they are getting through.

I miss using my critical care nursing skill set, which I developed over many years of practice. I could rely on my intuition and instincts, and almost always knew what to do. There is a nursing theorist who describes that process, and has written that it takes 10 years to get from novice to expert.

I don't think I could go back into the ICU again. It wouldn't be the same, and I don't think I could handle the relentless 12-hour shifts any more. I do miss it, thought. As I was writing this, I remembered the reason I thought about it. We drove past my old hospital on the way to take a walk in the rose garden and have lunch at a dim sum place in midtown.

wild rose

The rose garden was lovely as always. There were lots of people in the large park surrounding it, but very few people in the garden--mostly volunteers doing some pruning and watering. We wandered around for about a half-hour, sometimes stopping to sit on a bench and take it in.

grandfather plant

This reminded me of my grandfather's back yard. Not the grandfather I write about--the other one who died when I was fairly young--my dad's father. Our birthdays were one day apart, and when he turned 80, I turned 8. I remember him as an old man. His name was Joe.

I like the haziness of the picture. When I think of his back yard, it is hazy and somewhat desaturated in my memory, much like the image above. I could have sharpened it up, but let it be. I prefer my memories somewhat hazy.
asakiyume: (feathers on the line)
[personal profile] asakiyume
Did you ever play the authors card game? We had this when I was a kid: 13 authors--a pretty random assortment of 19th-century English and American writers, all men with the exception of Louisa May Alcott--with four works for each author. You play it like you play Go Fish, with the goal being to get as many completed sets of authors' works as possible. Wakanomori and I enjoyed playing it the other day, but I thought it would be fun to make up a set of YA fantasy works. [personal profile] osprey_archer is visiting, and we created a set. It's a fairly random assortment, only two male authors (CS Lewis and Lloyd Alexander), and two authors I follow here one LJ/DW (that would be [personal profile] sartorias and [profile] pamaladean). The authors had to have four works or series of works; we tried not to list individual works in a series, and we decided all the works should be fiction.

The original Authors game features portraits of the authors...



But we are not good at portraiture, so we used symbols for each author. [personal profile] sartorias, you're a fan! [personal profile] pameladean, you're a sprig of rosemary!

(click through to embiggen)
DSCN6425

DSCN6426

DSCN6427

DSCN6428

DSCN6429

Just now [profile] wakanomori, [personal profile] osprey_archer, and I played it. Very satisfying!
mallorys_camera: (Default)
[personal profile] mallorys_camera
Spent yesterday reading Joshua Green’s Devil’s Bargain cover to cover. An obsessively readable book all about the symbiotic relationship between Donald Trump and Steve Bannon.

Bannon was the mutagen who spun the conservative RNA, and Trump was the pointy-headed virus who penetrated the body politic. The disease was the narrative, Crooked Hillary.

The most interesting part of the book for me - since I am what the Trump team dubbed a “double hater” and it’s all about me-e-e-e, right? – was this:

[B]oth campaigns battled for a group of voters who would ultimately decide the race. ... Trump's data analysts gave them a nickname: 'double haters.' These were people who disliked both candidates but traditionally showed up at the polls to vote. They were a sizable bloc: 3 to 5 percent of the 15 million voters across seventeen battleground states that Trump's staff believed were persuadable.

Early on, many indicated support for third‐party candidate Gary Johnson. But after a series of televised flubs, ... they largely abandoned him. ... Many refused to answer pollsters' questions ... These were the voters Clinton had hoped to shear off from Trump with her 'alt-right' speech in August. ... Comey's letter had the effect of convincing the double haters to finally choose.


Double haters ended up going 47% for Trump, 30% for Clinton.

I stuck with the original game plan and voted for Gary Johnson.

As I see it, Comey's letter was not a precipitating event, but a cumulative event that was like the denouncement of a story that Bannon et al had been telling - but more importantly, circulating - about the Clintons for a very long time. The massive Hillary hatred was the result of a very conscious campaign.

Of course, Trump’s story is filled with as many if not more unpalatable facts than the Clintons, but since Trump was not a public servant until very recently, it’s difficult to work up a sense of moral outrage however easy it may be to feel personal disgust.

Also Trump was a celebrity, and the purpose of celebrities is to function as collective ids, no?

One of the most fascinating parts of Devil's Bargain, by the way, is how Trump managed to carry over the narrative from The Apprentice into his campaign. Trump benefited from advertisers' determination to make The Apprentice an ethnically inclusive show so it could sell more McDonald's hamburgers! Black and Hispanic voters LUVVED The Apprentice!
And this is one of the reasons why Trump didn't tank as badly among black and Hispanic voters as Democratic pollsters predicted he would.

Anyway, it’s very clear to me that unless the Left becomes more comfortable creating narratives, they’re cooked.

Epiphany

Jul. 20th, 2017 07:21 am
[personal profile] thisnewday
It occured to me, as I contemplated our nearly-completed workbench in the morning light, that this sucker is gonna have some serious weight to it.

Hell, the thing has about 3 gallons of wood glue and 50 lbs. of construction screws holding it together. And we have yet to install the cross-bracing for the lower shelf, the shelf itself, and the backing.

Per the instructions, we assembled it upside down and, for the sake of my back, built it on saw horses. So this morning I walked over to one end of it and gave it a lift. And guess what?

It ain't coming off those saw horses in the hands of a skinny, 14-year-old boy and a decrepit, 73-year-old man. I don't care if it is my birthday, lol.

On the other hand, calling in a moving company is definitely not in the budget so I guess I'll have to ambush, er, invite my son-in-law over. Maybe lie about having beer in the fridge and then say that I've got something that I want to show him in the basement.

Once we're down there, I'll say something like, "Hey, you know what? I think you 'd have a lot better idea about how it's gonna look if we'd just turn it right side up...

LPK
@Dreamwidth
7.20.2017

Centerpiece/Legacy

Jul. 20th, 2017 05:23 am
[personal profile] thisnewday
Two days ago, my grandson and I began assembling the workbench which will become the centerpiece of the basement workshop that I've recruited him to help me build.

Its design originated back in the early 1990s with a pair of experimental aircraft builders, Bob Waldmiller and Norm Howell, who wanted a durable but portable table for the fabrication and assembly of their homebuilt aircraft projects.

For our purposes, I've made a few modifications to the design to reflect its more permanent, less mobile place in our shop.

For instance, I've added a curb along its back edge to prevent tools and hardware from falling down between the table and the basement wall where it will be more or less permanently stationed. I've also incorporated a backing panel behind the single, lower shelf for the same purpose.

Due to my recent illness, and our initially intermitent work schedule, the many pieces that my grandson had measured and marked, based on the shop drawings I'd made up to guide his work, had been standing in neat stacks on the baseent floor awaiting assembly.

Up to now, they'd been cut on the table saw by me and then pre-drilled on the drill press by him to facilitate, and enhance the precision, of their assembly. And, as I said, we started that part of the process two days ago.

Last night, as a result of our last two days of work, the table was still upside-down on the saw horses, but very nearly complete. And I anticipate that today we'll be installing the shelf and standing it upright.

Just before I went to bed, I texted my grandson to tell him that I hadn't been able to resist a couple of late evening trips downstairs to admire our work and to say how much I appreciated his help and how pleased I am with the progress he's made in learning the necessary skills to accomplish this.

This Friday, because of the added hours, I'll be paying him double what he's taken home in any previous week. But what I really hope he'll be taking with him is a new confidence in his abilities and an understanding of what it means to put them to positive, constructive use.

Something he'll hopefully still have long after the school clothes which he intends to buy with his earnings have been consigned to the thrift shop and the grandfather who helped acquire them has been likewise recycled in the natural scheme of this life...

LPK
@Dreamwidth
7.20.2017

July 19--Getting ready

Jul. 19th, 2017 10:12 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
As I was sitting in the bathroom this morning, thinking, I noticed a very small spider, not much bigger than an ant, had let itself down on a strand of web from the ceiling, and stopped at eye level with me, just a few inches away. We watched each other for a bit. Eventually it started climbing back up toward the ceiling and I went on my way to face the rest of the day. I saw it as a good sign.

I went into work today to put some time in on the curriculum revision I am working on. I finished the revision part, and got a ways into the new content I am adding. This is for the community IV therapy course we have our students complete. I talked to my boss about it a bit, and she told me she was going to get me some funding for the hours I am putting into it. She's great like that.

I spent about 5 hours on the project, then came home and read one of my Hardy Boys books for a while. As things stand in the book, they just got arrested for mail theft and are in jail on a $50,000 bond. I can't imagine they will be able to get out of this, but there are subsequent books, so maybe.

chocko on the table

Chocko basks in the late afternoon light on the breakfast table. Don't tell Malida.

very merry

Jul. 19th, 2017 11:15 pm
gurdonark: (Default)
[personal profile] gurdonark
I worked hard but well today. After work. I walked in Glendover Park. I read the sad news that Senator John McCain contracted brain cancer. I read someone's semi-snarky tweet about his condition. I nearly responded with my disapproval, but refrained. I wish people had a little more heart sometimes.  I learned a better new thing this week--an old friend's cancer went into remission. I re-watched the first "Guardians of the Galaxy" movie on television.  I listened to the "Ask Noah" podcast. I read a journal entry from Christmas Eve 2014.  I thought yesterday how much I love Edna St. Vincent Millay's poem "Recuerdo".


breakfast: instant oatmeal
lunch: BBQ chicken breast, green beans and a roll
dinner: baked salmon, roast potatoes, and green beans

What?

Jul. 19th, 2017 05:13 pm
rosegardenfae: (Default)
[personal profile] rosegardenfae
Still deciding on the subject matter for this journal. Memoir? Creative writing?

July 18--A day at the fair

Jul. 18th, 2017 08:45 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
We went to the State Fair today as planned, though without our friend, who was feeling poorly. We did all the things we normally do at the fair.

wave thing

This is one of a couple of rides here that used to belong to Michael Jackson on his Neverland Ranch. Whee.

baby pigs!

See the livestock. Check. Baby pigs!

eggplants

Visit the gardening display. Check.

Visit the vendor pavilions and buy something we don't need, Check. Actually we bought some really cool peelers, and a few more sets of the sheets we bought last year. No Ginzu knives, though.

wine slushie

We tried something new this year. It's a blackberry wine slushie. It was delicious and very refreshing after walking around in the heat all day. While we were there, I ran into one of my former students, who was also enjoying a wine slushie. I almost always run into a former student at the fair.

corn dog

Corn dog. Check. A wise man once said that if you visit the State Fair and don't have a corn dog, it's as if you never went.

foot massager

$.25 vibrating foot massager. Check.

fair picture

Photo booth pictures. Check. This year's and last year's.

It was a fun day.

non-fearsome but feared

Jul. 18th, 2017 09:26 pm
gurdonark: (Default)
[personal profile] gurdonark
I like work now. It's a bit busy. After work I walked on the Celebration Trail in Allen. When I walked in the underpass beneath Angel Parkway, a small non-poisonous snake crawled into the shade. I worried that the little snake would be harmed by a panicked hiker, runner or bicyclist. I steeled myself for the worst. People get so carried away about snakes.

When I walked back, I got passed by a dad and daughter on their bicycles (Dad had a son in a pull cart) rode. The daughter, perhaps  5 or 6, said "this will take forever, daddy!". He tried to show her on a map on his phone that they had nearly finished the ride. She looked at the map but was unimpressed.

When I got back to the pedestrian underpass the snake was in good and unobtrusive shape.  But the little girl was afraid. The Dad pointed out out it was only a rat snake. They bicycled by the snake without incident. But the little girl cried once she had ridden past. 

breakfast: brown rice crisp cereal
lunch: turkey sandwich, baked chips, vegetable soup
dinner: turkey sandwiches on sandwich slims with chips

witness bears

Jul. 18th, 2017 07:48 pm
asakiyume: (nevermore)
[personal profile] asakiyume
Out of the corner of my ear I was listening to a Cornell West lecture from the 1990s, and in it he said "witness bearers," but I heard "witness bears," and I know bare-bear-bear wordplay is low-hanging fruit, but here is a witness bear.

witness bear

In other news, Wakanomori and I are nearly done watching Person of Interest. I *really* have liked this show. Not every single everything--I'm not into gangster plotlines--but all the characters, intensely, and the care with which the overall story arc was handled, and the AI, free will, ends-means, creator-created stuff, very much so.

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